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      News — KAIA naturals

      Say goodbye to ingrown hairs with these 5 simple tips

      Have you ever wondered how to get rid of INGROWN HAIRS? How to prevent them? Or what to do if you get one? 

      Hair removal methods such as shaving, waxing or tweezing can cause ingrown hairs, and often produce itchy and icky painful red bumps. In some cases, ingrown hairs can be super uncomfortable and even become infected! Instead of squeezing or picking at them, here are some more efficient (and much less painful) ways to help stop them!

      1️. EXFOLIATE

      Ingrown hairs are commonly caused by dead skin cells. Exfoliate weekly to help remove these cells and reduce the chance of ingrown hairs.

      2️. STAY MOISTURIZED

      Keeping skin consistently hydrated and moisturized is an extremely important step in achieving hair that behaves well.

      3️. DON’T SHAVE WITH A DULL BLADE

      Be sure to use a sharp and clean razor to cut off the hair bluntly in one pass and to prevent the razor from catching or dragging hairs.

      4️. USE A SHAVING GEL, OIL OR CREAM

      There should always be a hydrating barrier between your skin and the blade when shaving to cushion the contact when the razor meets your skin.

      5️. SHAVE WITH THE GRAIN

      Shave gently with the grain (the direction in which your hair grows) to avoid ingrown hairs, as shaving in the opposite direction can cause the regrowth of the hair to curl back into the skin.

      Written by: Kaia Naturals 

      The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of Safe & Chic, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.

      HAIRLINE PIMPLES? HERE’S A QUICK HACK!

      Regular breakouts are bad enough, but when you start to get pimples on your hairline, and on the back of your neck, it hardly seems fair and it can be quite painful – especially because the hairline and scalp area are known to be quite sensitive. These pimples are normally caused by irritation resulting from oil building. Luckily, there’s one product that you may already have laying around at home that you can use to help reduce breakouts around the scalp and hairline area.

      THREE POSSIBLE AGGRAVATORS THAT LEAD TO ZITS

      Pimples that form on the hairline, the back of your neck, or directly on the scalp normally appear because your pores are congested with excess buildup of oil, hair product, and dead cells.  The reason this happens is because bacteria begins to form as a result of excess oil on the scalp. This causes redness, swelling. However, there are three main aggravators that can make this problem worse, which leads to unwanted breakouts.

      YOUR SHAMPOO: Using non-natural shampoo and conditioners can actually accelerate the build-up of sebum in your pores. They often contain silicones, which suffocate your skin if residue is left behind. Some non-natural shampoos (and even natural shampoos) contain rich oils and emollients that are comedogenic. AND, if you have bangs like me, you may notice that they tend to get oily throughout the day – even if you just showered. If you use a conditioner that’s too rich, or if your face moisturizer is too heavy, product residue will mix with your bands which increases that oily or greasy feeling. And, as they lay on your forehead, this can increase the risk of breakouts.

      YOUR HAIR PRODUCTS: Styling products (particularly those that are sprayed on through aerosol cans) leave residue behind that can easily land on your forehead, and wreak havoc on oily skin! Imagine stepping out into a hot summer day, or even just going to bed, with hair product build-up and dirt mixing in with your skin and face…it’s not a pretty outcome.

      YOUR BEDTIME ROUTINE:Not addressing oily hair before going to bed and sleeping with oily hair around your face for 6-8 hours, will DEFINITELY congest your pores and lead to breakouts. Especially if you have longer hair that tends to fall on your face while you sleep.

      HERE’S HOW TO FIX THIS

      I get it…sometimes you may find something that works wonders for your hair, and then find out it may be the reason you’re getting pimples on your hairline or on the back of your neck. One solution would be to stop using it completely, OR you simply modify the way you use the product.

      USE NATURAL DRY SHAMPOO POWDER

      Yes, dry shampoo can help absorb oil on your skin…but only if it’s natural. I actually spray a natural dry shampoo powder to help reduce oil production on my forehead.

      Full disclosure it is my company’s product the takesumi detox the overnight dry shampoo, but the real reason I developed was because I had oily bangs and I did not want to use aerosol propellants on my hair or for the environment. I developed a product that was all-natural powder and safe to spray on my forehead to absorb oil both at night and during the day. Because the takesumi detox overnight dry shampoo is aerosol free and made with micronized rice starch, it could also function as an oil absorbing face powder, so no need to worry about it on your face. This means it’s safe and gentle for your scalp, forehead, and back of the neck.

      Of course, you can use any natural dry shampoo you want – as long as it’s 100% natural, and is a powder form with a starch base.

      Article written by: Kaia Naturals

      The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of Safe & Chic, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.