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Does Drinking Water Help Your Skin? We Set the Record Straight.

Safe & Chic

Posted on May 13 2020

Let’s get right to the point: yes, 100%. Water absolutely helps your skin to look smooth and dewy. Of course, a good skincare routine that includes cleansing, moisturizing and avoiding pore-clogging products is also essential, but your routine is nothing without water. Honestly, you can never be too moisturized when it comes to your skin (except for that time we took the whole “coconut oil on everything” thing too far and ended up looking like a basted turkey). You might be thinking, “Okay, great. But, I use moisturizing products on the daily. So, that’s enough, right?”

Sadly, no. Hydrating cleansers and moisturizing serums are usually packed with hyaluronic acid and glycerin, both highly hydrating ingredients, but they still need help supplying all the nutrients and moisture your skin craves. Hyaluronic acid may sound scary (who wants to put anything with the word “acid” on their face?), but it’s actually a substance that already exists naturally in our bodies, AND it absorbs water 1,000 times its weight. Glycerin is another ingredient that we definitely stan because it’s great at pulling water to the outer layer of your skin. 

But, if you’re not hydrating properly, your moisturizers can’t do their job, no matter what expensive products and in-depth skincare routine you’re using. Bottom line: drink 👏 more 👏  water 👏 . This guide on the basics of water and skincare will help you sip your way to gorgeous skin.

Yes, Water Really *Does* Help Your Skin

We’ll say it one more time for the people in the back: your skin needs water. Much like your heart or lungs, your skin is an organ that relies on vitamins, minerals, proteins and enzymes to keep it healthy. To get those necessities, it needs water. Hydration keeps skin plump, elastic and even. Without it, your skin can’t flush out toxins that disrupt a clear complexion.

Recognizing Signs of Dehydrated Skin

Okay, got it. Skin needs water. Noted. So, how can we tell if it's dehydrated? Here are some super simple ways to tell if your skin is thristayyy. 

  • Dry, rough, flaky patches. Dry, flaky skin usually occurs on the outermost layer (the epidermis), and if it’s dehydrated, it starts to lose that smooth elasticity, causing your skin to flake. 
  • Redness and irritation. Dry skin often feels itchy and irritated, which makes us want to mess with it even though we know we shouldn’t. The more you scratch your skin, the more irritated and red it will become, so pump that moisture back in ASAP.
  • Wrinkles and fine lines. Don’t be alarmed, but dry skin does lead to wrinkles. *Chugs water immediately.* Test your skin by lightly pressing your cheek or chin. If you see slight wrinkles when you apply pressure, your skin is probably begging for some water.
  • Dullness or lack of shine. We all want that smooth, glowing complexion that lets your beautiful, natural features do the work without even using highlighter. If you’re standing in front of the mirror right now trying to figure out wtf “dullness” means, basically your skin looks washed out and, well, dry. It probably also feels rough or uneven.
  • Pain and blemishes. The more water you drink, the fewer blemishes you’ll have. And, if your skin or lips are really dry, they may even crack, which is super painful.
  • Dark spots under eyes. We associate dark circles with lack of sleep, stress and, duh, a hangover. But, one of the most common triggers of dark spots is dehydration.
  • Oily skin. Just because your skin is oily doesn’t mean it’s hydrated. Your skin can be over-producing oil to compensate for lack of moisture in it, which is why dehydrated skin can be mistaken for oily skin. In fact, people with acne-prone or oily skin are more likely to suffer from dehydration, as they tend to use harsh products that strip the skin of moisture.

Skincare Benefits of Drinking Water

When your skin is dehydrated, it acts like skin that is much older, meaning it’s prone to breakouts, wrinkles and heightened sensitivity. These are some seriously desirable benefits of making water part of your routine.

  • Brightens your skin, giving that beautiful, highlighter-less glow. 
  • Flushes toxins from your skin like dirt and oil…and maybe last night’s bottle of wine.
  • Reduces and prevents wrinkles by keeping your skin toned. Skin with more elasticity is less likely to wrinkle.
  • Keeps your lips soft. Ever notice how your lips tend to crack when they’re dry? Yeah, drink some water, girl. 
  • Gives you a radiant complexion. When your skin is being hydrated from within, it has a more luminous glow that can be amplified with the help of other externally moisturizing products
  • How Much Water Does Your Skin Need?
  • Skin + water = good. We think you got the point, so the real question here is how much water should you drink a day? Many doctors recommend drinking 64 ounces of water per day to keep your body healthy. Although there’s no set amount of water to drink specifically for your skin, we try to get as close to this number as possible by sipping throughout the day. Refill and carry around your 8 oz, 16 oz, or 32 oz water bottle, or to remind yourself to drink without obsessing over it too much.

    As the largest organ in your body, your skin deserves a lot of attention, so it’s important to keep it happy and healthy. Drinking plenty of water every day is the foundation for beautiful skin––and that combined with an effective skincare routine will help you to be your dewiest, smoothest and most glowing you.

  • Article Written by - BKR

    The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of Safe & Chic, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.